How is Alimony Calculated in Oklahoma?

A divorce has many moving parts. Every divorce involves dividing the couple’s marital property. If the couple has children, child custody, and a child support order must be established. Alimony, payment made from one spouse to the other to protect him or her from facing financial hardship as a result of the divorce if there will be a significant income disparity after it is finalized.

Alimony can be permanent or bound to a specific time frame as the court deems appropriate for the couple. It can also be paid in installments or in one lump sum. The court may also order that the paying spouse provide the other with alimony through personal property, rather than a cash payment.

 

Temporary Spousal Support vs. Alimony

Temporary spousal support is money paid by one spouse to the other while their divorce is pending. When the divorce is finalized, this order is terminated.

Alimony is the financial support the lesser earning spouse receives after their divorce is finalized. This is part of the couple’s divorce settlement; the paying spouse’s obligation does not begin until the divorce process is complete and the couple is no longer married. Although an alimony order can be permanent, this is becoming less common.

 

In Oklahoma, There is No Alimony Calculator

Rather, courts use relevant information about each divorcing couple to determine the most appropriate alimony arrangement for them, if one is appropriate at all. Information the court may consider includes:

  • The length of the couple’s marriage;
  • Each partner’s current income;
  • Each partner’s future employability and projected income;
  • Each partner’s personal assets;
  • How long it will take the lesser earning spouse to become self-supporting;
  • Each spouse’s personal and financial needs after the divorce; and
  • The higher earning spouse’s ability to pay alimony to the recipient.

If one or both halves of a divorced couple experiences a change in circumstances after the divorce, the alimony order can be modified. If the receiving spouse dies, the order automatically terminates. If he or she remarries, this is generally also the case, but it is possible for alimony to continue if the recipient demonstrates to the court that continued payment is necessary and reasonable.

 

Work with an Experienced Oklahoma City Divorce Lawyer

 

If you are considering ending your marriage, work with an experienced divorce lawyer to ensure that your rights are protected and your interests are fully pursued. To get started with our firm, contact The Law Office of Robert R. Robles today to set up your initial consultation.